Game film study for high school lacrosse?

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Re: Game film study for high school lacrosse?

Postby Grizz » Tue Sep 29, 2009 7:46 pm

I think films would be more valuable for the coaches to review. They can run them over and over to watch how a team develops their attack or defense, and observe a particular player’s strengths and weaknesses in the privacy of their own computer, and only watch what pertains to them. To be effective for the whole team, an entire practice would be taken up showing what happens for individual situations. If the team were broken up, less time would be wasted, but I think their time is better served on the practice field working on the plan that the coach developed for a given team.
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Re: Game film study for high school lacrosse?

Postby Billax » Tue Sep 29, 2009 8:10 pm

Useful perspective, Grizz.
Sports don't build character, they reveal it. - Heywood Broun
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Re: Game film study for high school lacrosse?

Postby picknroll » Tue Sep 29, 2009 11:22 pm

Grizz wrote:I think films would be more valuable for the coaches to review. They can run them over and over to watch how a team develops their attack or defense, and observe a particular player’s strengths and weaknesses in the privacy of their own computer, and only watch what pertains to them. To be effective for the whole team, an entire practice would be taken up showing what happens for individual situations. If the team were broken up, less time would be wasted, but I think their time is better served on the practice field working on the plan that the coach developed for a given team.


Here's how my HS football coach ran things WAY long ago ...

1. After our Friday night game (and party after the game) we had a mandatory film session at 8AM Saturday morning. This was before camcorders so they had a guy developing the film overnight. Our Sat AM sessions went about 2 hours with play-by-play critique and commentary from our coach.

2. The coaching staff began preparing for the next opponent over the weekend by getting film of virtually all of our next oppenent's game from their coaching network, which was considered fair game. They spent the weekend watching these films and putting together a playbook (offense and defense) of the opponent.

3. We opened the week on Monday with a 60 minute film session that included highlights of key formations, plays, and players for that week's opponents. We also received the opponent playbook (written by our coaches from scouting film) and scout teams were assigned for the week from 2nd/3rd string players. We followed the Mon film session with a practice (shortened from our normal 3 hours to 2 hours).

4. Thursday (day before game) was the light practice day and we had another 90 minute film and chalk session for final prep before our Friday game. We then played on Friday night and started the cycle all over again.

All of that may seem extreme, but it was just part of the culture. This system produced teams that seldom lost and routinely sent 4 or 5 guys each year into NCAA Div I and a few into the NFL. The football IQ of our team was off the charts. For me it was a life lesson in planning and preparation which endured beyond the football field.

This was a different time/place/sport. I'm not suggesting that this could be replicated, but I do believe there is real value in players studying film to learn the game. It certainly has it's place.
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