College recruiting - Finding the Right School

Post interesting articles, your philosophies, or any random lacrosse topics.

Re: College recruiting - Finding the Right School

Postby Billax » Sun Oct 31, 2010 10:09 am

Here's a good article, citing a number of college coaches, which supports DlaxDad's opinion that travel teams are becoming a more important way to be seen and evaluated.
http://rise.espn.go.com/lacrosse/articles/Recruiting-Road/Role-of-club-lacrosse.aspx?pursuit=Lacrosse
Sports don't build character, they reveal it. - Heywood Broun
User avatar
Billax
Forum Father
Forum Father
 
Posts: 3553
Joined: Thu Jul 29, 2004 6:49 am
Location: 37.882767, -122.198214

Re: College recruiting - Finding the Right School

Postby Billax » Sun Oct 31, 2010 1:03 pm

DlaxDad's series of posts on recruiting earns him my nomination for poster of the year. Comprehensive, clear and compelling. The best series of posts ever written on this Forum, in my view.

I'll add two posts, attempting to recall the lessons we learned in our son's recruiting experience. It involves lots of people and lots of hard decisions, but it may be useful to a few parents/players who are facing recruiting challenges and opportunities now. The list is focused mainly on tactics and process, mostly covering things we wish we'd known or wish we'd done differently. In the military, I think they call this an After Action Review (AAR) - mainly to identify mistakes so as not to repeat them. This is what we learned. As the saying goes, Your mileage may vary.

The 25 things we learned (Part I):
Lacrosse is not an end in itself, merely a means to an end

1 Play with boys you know
Your player's game will show more completely if he's playing with guys he's played with before. Camps for individuals are OK, but they rarely show the complete skill set of your player. Those skills show up better on travel teams. That said, California Gold is an exception to the rule, because their selection process assures that your son will be facing the toughest competition possible - on every play of every game - and college coaches can best assess a player's athleticism and quickness in this setting. If your player makes the cut at tryouts, attend.

2 Ill effects from wear & tear
Don't overdo the number of camps you attend on a recruiting camp trip. Especially on the East Coast, the weather is very hot and very humid - taking a toll both in energy and physical wear. In one three week period of four camps and tournaments, the boy went from 175 pounds to 163 - it definitely affected his play in the later tournaments.

3 Coaches' schedules and half-game cycles
When attending a camp or tourney where multiple fields are in use simultaneously, expect most coaches to watch half a game, then move to another field. If your club or school team rotates players, they should rotate them once each half. If that's the way your travel team works, all the boys will be seen, but they'll have to make the most of their rotations.

4 Off days should be rest days
We tried to fill the days between tournaments with visits to schools - some of which were two hundred miles from the last camp. Bad idea for us to have done that. The boy didn't rest and recover as much as he needed.

5 Early, Middle and Late (coaches have a longer recruit list than you'd expect)
We came to understand that, from a coaches point of view, boys are early, middle, or late recruits. Coaches have a difficult time building a recruiting class. Their "short list" is a wish list that rarely comes to pass. That's why they always have a longer list - by position - that they use to fill gaps in their class. Try to understand whether your boy is early, middle, or late. It will calm you. More about how you determine this later in this post. Coaches take a long time to build a class. What do you care if you're early, middle, or late - if you end up being admitted to a school that's a perfect intellectual, social, and lacrosse fit for you?

6 Buy a GPS
You'll recall from DlaxDad's posts that you'll cover a lot of ground in a short number of days. A GPS device (with a voice) will keep you from going crazy, though the voice may end up making you crazy in a different way! Best money we spent.

7 Website, emails, calls to coaches
This is all about getting coaches' attention. We elected to use a sport-specific website that allowed us to enter all the necessary information about our boy. What is necessary information? Well, it includes a highlight reel, full-game footage, transcripts, grade reports, weighted and unweighted GPA, test scores (PSAT, then later SAT or ACT results), Club coach's email and phone, High School coach's email and phone, tournament and camp schedule, profile of the boy's High School, fact sheet about the boy, and a statistical recap of prior seasons. Then, it facilitates communication with coaches if you have the email and phone number of every college Lacrosse coach in the United States. Of course, all this information can be gathered and packaged up without a recruiting website. It just was much easier for us to use one of them. The one we chose was LacrosseRecruits.com. We were highly satisfied with their service. Remember, just because DI coaches can't initiate or return emails to you until September 1st of the Junior year, and can't initiate phone calls to you until you're nearly a Senior, that doesn't mean you can't call or write them. Email consistently and specifically to each school on your target list. Call coaches when something of importance comes up that would allow coaches to ask you questions. Call early in the AM: 5:30 AM here is already 8:30 AM on the East Coast. Having said that, during the boy's Sophomore year, about ninety percent of his calls were not picked up, though he left a message every time. In the summer, after more schools had seen him play, he was very excited when he called a coach who picked up and said, "Hey, ----, what's up?" before the boy had said a word. We felt, correctly as it turned out, that he was a "short list" candidate at that school. Importantly, NCAA DI rules do not prohibit college coaches from calling your High School or Club coach and conveying information to them of interest to you. You'd be surprised how often this happens.

8 The role of the consigliere
This turned out to be the single best thing we did. The requirements for a consigliere are quite specific and quite hard to find. In an ideal world, your advisor should have been a college player at a high level, have known your son for many years, have watched him develop as a player and as a person, have strong personal relationships with college coaches, and will tell your boy where he is a good fit - academically and athletically. Most telling for us was our advisor's commentary on which locker rooms would have player personalities that matched our boy. Finally, your advisor should be able to make the occasional call to a coach when he thinks there's a good fit between player and school. I don't have permission to say who we used, other than to say the boy's recruiting experience would not have been nearly as successful without him. Cost? Nothing in dollars - priceless in value.

9 Value of a fact sheet
Context and character matter. Coaches aren't buying just an athlete. They're buying a person. It's useful to help coaches understand what the boy is like, both on-field and off-field.

10 Constructing a highlight reel - sections, opponent quality, value of great footage
The highlight reel is your central marketing document. It shows the skills, athleticism, and teamwork capabilities of your player. It should have sections showing individual skills, coordination skills, and, in my opinion, some moments showing how the player reacts to other teammates when a score, assist, or save occurs. A college coach will want to see how his candidates fit in with a team. Next, getting good footage is difficult. Really difficult! Most footage gathered by and for High School Coaches is half-field view. That's perfect for your High School coaches, but imperfect for a highlight reel. The High School our player attends is lucky to have a videographer who tapes games focusing on a view showing three things in the picture: a) the player with the ball and his on-ball defender, b) the adjacent players and, c) the goal. The footage is tighter so that College Coaches can easily see individual moves and checks, but still see enough of the adjacent action to assess how the player works in team situations. At the front of the video, include a helmet-off mug shot of your player, name and number the player, list the High School and city, include GPA and season stats. Add the High School Coach's name and, demonstrate the level of competition your player is facing. Use LaxPower ratings for this. They are universally understood by college coaches. All this will give the coach an understanding of the video by making him aware of the level of competition your player is facing.

11 Academic Index for Ivies
If your player is a VERY strong student, you may have an interest in colleges that are quite difficult to get into. IVY League and NESCAC schools use the Academic Index (AI) to rate all athletic candidates. In short, the AI profiles every candidate on three measures: Rank in class or weighted GPA, the Math and Critical Reading sections of the SAT, and performance on the two highest scores from the SAT II. Each element maxes out at 80 points, for a total theoretical top score of 240. No Ivy can take a player with an AI below 171, and each Ivy must have an average AI for the recruiting class of no more than one standard deviation below the median AI score of non-athlete admits. The AI for most Ivy athletic teams ranges between 205 and 211. Other conferences - such as the Centennial - having highly selective schools in the conference, will have similar measures. Try to help your player understand where he fits! Read Playing the Game: Inside Athletic Recruiting in the Ivy League by Chris Lincoln. It will help you understand the otherwise inchoate practices of highly selective schools.

12 Where does your player stand on a school's list?
Knowing where you stand with a coach and a school is REALLY important. Interestingly, if you ask, coaches will almost always tell you where you stand, either overall or by position. They've done this hundreds - maybe thousands - of times. They're good at it and, almost always, they'll be frank in the nicest possible way. Oftentimes, the player or his parents don't ask, maybe because they don't know to ask or maybe because they are afraid of the answer. Our point of view was - ASK. Better to know where you stand than to live in hope. In other words, the sooner you take your disappointments, the sooner you'll get to the right set of schools.

Part II, coming in a day or two, will cover the following topics:

13 Improving on your own: strength, speed, muscle mass, conditioning
14 SAT test prep
15 Forming the initial list of schools
16 How coaches prioritize a player list at recruiting camps
17 Send duplicates of all required camp forms with your kid, Don't assume the camp has them.
18 Value of college-specific camps
19 Why you should shut up about your player's recruiting process
20 Visit when school's in session
21 Video highlight tips
22 Know what your HS coach thinks of you 
23 How to accept, how to decline, how to say thank you to those who helped you
24 The advantages you start with by attending a given High School: Lax history, reputation for work ethic, DI players who preceded you, highly respected, straight-shooting coach
25 Crunching the numbers. Is it all worth it?
Sports don't build character, they reveal it. - Heywood Broun
User avatar
Billax
Forum Father
Forum Father
 
Posts: 3553
Joined: Thu Jul 29, 2004 6:49 am
Location: 37.882767, -122.198214

Re: College recruiting - Finding the Right School

Postby Billax » Mon Nov 01, 2010 12:33 pm

Part II
Lacrosse is not an end in itself, it is a means to an end


13 Improving on your own: strength, speed, muscle mass, conditioning
College coaches are pretty good at predicting your future - in some ways. They'll size up a player's physical assets - height, weight, skeletal structure - and pretty accurately project your player into his college size, as early as his Sophomore year. But their projections assume that you'll do the extra work that'll get you to their projections. The boy works out six days a week in the off-season with a pretty large group of guys from his school, all of whom are committed to becoming as good as they can be. This past summer, the High Schoolers were joined by a number of current Bay Area DI players. He reported that these college guys are huge compared to the size they were in High School. Their bulk, compared to their High School playing weight, is much greater. Why? They lift, run stairs, and do other conditioning drills almost every day. Running up a hill with more than a thousand steps - nonstop - is not fun. On one day or another, each of them will barf while running the hill. I'm amazed at the workouts these guys do. It's not for everyone.

14 SAT test prep
Do it! It costs next to nothing to get practice tests from the College Board. Take 5 or 6 practice tests. Analyze areas of weakness and address them. Good board scores are mandatory at good schools.

15 Forming the initial list of schools
I guess you can start the recruiting process by playing at tournaments and camps and seeing who likes you. Or, you can start by figuring out which schools are a fit for your player, both academically and for lacrosse. Both methods have merit. Like DlaxDad, we developed a list of schools that fit - our target list - and had the boy focus on that list of schools. This started in September of his Sophomore year. It made the process easier for our son, knowing that his job was to pursue schools, rather than hope schools would pursue him. Nine schools were on the list, both DIII and DI. All these schools limit the time spent playing, practicing, and preparing for lacrosse - by agreement among all the schools in their athletic conferences - to fewer days than the maximum allowed for lacrosse by the NCAA. We thought/think these limitations provide a balance between academic and athletics that was best for the boy over the long run. Other parents, with other goals, will have different opinions. For us, having a target list and sticking to it was a way that fit the strengths, weaknesses, interests, and ambitions of our boy. Our deal with him was: "If you'll trust us to pick the universe of schools that fits you - the target list - we'll trust you to make the final selection." Worked fine.

16 How coaches prioritize a player list at recruiting camps
At a camp not attended by our boy, we were watching another player from the boy's High School perform. As we were sitting on the sidelines, a DI coach from a prominent program, carrying a clipboard and a lawn chair, sat down next to us. I took the opportunity to ask how he could possibly evaluate hundreds of boys. His response was interesting: "We can't. First, we make a list of boys who've contacted us. Then we add in boys we've heard about from our own players. Then we add players we've heard about from High School coaches we trust. Then we watch those boys play. In the course of watching those boys, we'll often see other players we add to our list. But it all starts with those who contact us."

17 Send duplicates of all required camp forms with your boy, Don't assume the camp has them.
Camps require all kinds of forms to be filled out and sent in. Sometimes, the administrative side of the camp isn't perfect. If you can imagine being 3,000 miles from home when a camp administrator says, "We don't have your insurance and medical forms. You can't participate," you learn to send hard copies of all required documents along with your player. Maybe that seems anal, but it has happened to the boy!

18 Value of school-specific camps
If you have a target list of schools, consider going to lacrosse summer camps sponsored by those schools. Initially, we didn't see the value of these camps. We were wrong. Going to a school-specific camp allows a player to meet the coaches, see how they instruct, see whether their styles would be compatible with the player, and generally allows player and coaches from that school to get to know each other better. But, if you don't have a target list of schools, this would be an inefficient way to spend your money.

19 Why you should shut up about your player's recruiting process
College coaches talk to each other. High School coaches talk to college coaches. Teammates talk to college coaches. Little brothers talk to big brothers who play at a college your player may have visited. Word about your player's opinions travels fast. Most important, nobody wants to hear parents yapping about their son's recruiting experience. Keep it private until it's done! When asked, parents would be well advised to say no more than, "Yes, the boy made a verbal commitment to X school. He's thrilled and we're very happy for him." Anything more comes too close to bragging.

20 Visit when school's in session
In our view, the only serious reason to attend college is to learn to lead a moral and ethical life. Read the great philosophers, understand the origins and principles of Western Civilization, understand Mathematics, Sciences and Economics, the great sweep of History, etc. That's just us. But those beliefs - right or wrong - led us to conclude that choosing a college without auditing classes and meeting a wide range of non-lacrosse-playing students wasn't really choosing a college, it was choosing a lacrosse team.

21 Video highlight tips
I think I covered most of the key parts above, but you should know that highlight reels are supposed to be 4 1/2 to 6 minutes long. While I personally like them a little longer, I'm not a coach who's viewing 50 a day! Players are also expected to create "full game" footage for coaches' viewing. If you're a defender that means you need only show those sequences when the ball's in your half of the field and you're in the game. Same for Attacks and Goalies. Sorry, mids, you need to have the video show whole field action, but only when you're on the field. Here are some numbers about coaches viewing vids that I found interesting. In the case of our player, coaches watched the highlight film a total of 205 times. They watched full game footage as follows: QI - 65 views, Q2 - 67 views, Q3 - 134 views. Our player didn't play in the fourth quarter of his full game tape, so the third quarter was his final quarter. I wondered why his last quarter was watched by coaches more times than his first and second quarters combined. So I asked a DI coach about it. The answer was telling. He said, "We want to see if our candidates go just as hard in the last quarter as they do early in the game. You'd be surprised how many guys run out of drive, precision, or energy late in the game. We try and avoid those players. The only way we can tell is to watch the last quarter and see how different it is from what's shown in the highlight reel."

22 Know what your High School coach thinks of you
It's useful for your son to discuss the colleges he is thinking of pursuing with his High School coach. After all, his coach will be called by college coaches, who'll ask about his skills, his character, his work ethic, and his qualities as a teammate. For the best of reasons, your High School coach must tell the truth as he sees it. For if he does not, his ability to help future players will diminish, as college coaches will no longer trust his judgment. Every coach must keep his reputation golden. His reputation is what will allow your High School coach, some years down the road, to say to a College Coach who is uncertain about a player, "Take a chance on this boy. I know you - and I know him. He's a fit for your program."
 
23 How to accept, how to decline, how to say thank you to those who helped you
When the time comes to decide, call the college coach and tell him why you're accepting his offer and why you're very grateful that he made the offer. Thank him. When you call a college coach to decline his offer, tell him of your decision and thank him for his offer. Tell him what you liked about his school and his program. And then, thank him again! Finally, when those communications are complete, the longest list of thank-you calls begins. As a player, you are the product of the time and attention given to you over many years by teachers, coaches, and mentors. Until you become a coach, which I hope you will, you'll have no idea how important these calls are. Ask your son to sit down and construct a list of those who helped him, both in lacrosse and in his personal development. It's his list, not yours. Ask him to call the people who have made a difference in his life, tell those people that he's committed to play college lacrosse, and thank them for the things they did to prepare him for his decision. We believe - and so does our son - that these calls are the most rewarding calls ever!

24 Your High School makes a difference
NorCal High Schools such as De La Salle, San Ramon Valley, Saint Ignatius - and a few more - regularly send lacrosse players to NCAA programs. These schools have reputations. Their graduates have played for a number of colleges and, naturally, college coaches have formed some opinions about these High School programs. In a rough way, they know about the school's Lacrosse history, its reputation for work ethic within the program, DI players who preceded you, and that these schools have coaches who are straight shooters. Players attending these schools do have the advantage of having their program known and vetted. If your player doesn't attend one of these schools, he'll have to work a bit harder to get exposure. So, remember what the coach with the clipboard said, and write, write, write!

25 Crunch the numbers. Is it all worth it?
Your son's happiness is difficult to define in dollars spent. Lacrosse is a fairly expensive sport. College is very expensive. We don't have any generalizations - other than that it was painful for us - but wish you all the best in sorting through these costs and finding the best overall investment in your son!
Sports don't build character, they reveal it. - Heywood Broun
User avatar
Billax
Forum Father
Forum Father
 
Posts: 3553
Joined: Thu Jul 29, 2004 6:49 am
Location: 37.882767, -122.198214

Re: College recruiting - Finding the Right School

Postby PDJ » Wed Nov 03, 2010 12:36 pm

Billax and Dlaxdad --

Bravo.

Thank you for taking the time to share the wisdom gained from your experiences.
PDJ
Practice Player
Practice Player
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Jun 11, 2008 3:58 pm
Location: SF

Re: College recruiting - Finding the Right School

Postby Billax » Mon Nov 08, 2010 12:57 pm

PDJ wrote:Billax and Dlaxdad --

Bravo.

Thank you for taking the time to share the wisdom gained from your experiences.

You're very welcome. DlaxDad and I have known each other for a long time - he might say too long! This will be the seventh year that our boys have played with and/or against each other. Knowing DlaxDad and his family has been one of the great things in my life. He's smart, analytic, articulate and funny - all qualities that found me being in the shallow end of the gene pool. When he started off on his recruiting journey with his son, I asked him if I could go to school on his dime. Graciously, he agreed. He found lacrosserecruits.com and recommended it. He worked through the idea of a target list. These key elements of the recruiting process - and many more - came straight from his mouth. I was merely smart enough to follow his recommendations. When he wrote the first post on this thread, I encouraged him to write more. It was pure gold, and I was eager to get as much as he was giving.

My small contribution to this thread falls into the category of adding footnotes. Glad I could contribute something, but DlaxDad wrote the book. I believe that our little NorCal outpost of the lacrosse community, through folks like DlaxDad, continues our sports' long tradition of giving back to the game. We're lucky to have folks that buy into giving back! DlaxDad will be with us for one more season, before his son goes off to college. He's irreplaceable, but I'm hoping that some set of readers will consider posting on High School games, the travel team scene, recruiting stories, and all the rest that he keeps us informed about. The value to readers of the NorCal Lax Forum depends upon the selfless quality of our posters, and DlaxDad is the gold standard in that respect.
Sports don't build character, they reveal it. - Heywood Broun
User avatar
Billax
Forum Father
Forum Father
 
Posts: 3553
Joined: Thu Jul 29, 2004 6:49 am
Location: 37.882767, -122.198214

Re: College recruiting - Finding the Right School

Postby DlaxDad » Thu Nov 11, 2010 11:09 pm

I've been a little out of pocket, and somewhat restricted from posting because my laptop's power source blew up. And during the day I've actually been working. Who knew?

Thanks to PDJ very much for the kudos. I hope people who are just starting down the recruiting road may find a little something useful from my glorified travelogue. I knew next to nothing when we started thinking that, yes, maybe the boy might want to play lacrosse in college. It's tough to figure out how to get a California boy on the East Coast radar, to decide where to focus your energies, D1 or D2 or D3, and even to learn how lacrosse and college might go together.

As to Billax, I just wish I'd had his posts laminated and in hand when we started out. It's always your rabbi who credits you for finding a way you hardly noticed him pointing out to you -- and Billax is my lax rabbi, and not just mine. At the risk of convening a meeting of the mutual admiration society, I owe a huge amount of my meager lax chops to the infinite curiosity, persistence, acuity, and wisdom of Billax. If anything, Billax has spurred me on, prodded me to be a better spectator, fan, and parent, in the same way, I think, as our boys made each other better during all those years of club and travel ball. He is a master of understated praise and deft positive criticism, and this forum owes a huge debt to guys like Billax for the unique tone of civil observation and, when appropriate, respectful disagreement.

And while I'm at it, a huge shout out to Back Door, for making this possible for all of us. I think I'll go back to geezer lax this season -- maybe in gratitude I'll let Door drive past me to the rack a few times . . . . like I could stop Door when he's on a mission.

I hope this topic keeps growing, and that players and parents will add on with their experiences, because that will mean that more and more NorCal boys are playing the ancient game and taking it to the next level . . . . and giving something back to the game and to their community.

And ain't that the meaning of grace?
A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.
User avatar
DlaxDad
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 2259
Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2006 10:14 pm
Location: Lamorinda

Primer for High Schoolers on college recruitment

Postby CATLAX MAN » Wed Dec 15, 2010 6:13 pm

Here is an excellent article for high school lacrosse players to read on the college recruitment process. There's a lot of good information in this article.

Homegrown Lacrosse wrote:For any high school lacrosse player, the ultimate dream is the chance to be a part of a strong collegiate program. The reality is that knowing who to talk to, getting seen by the right people and selecting the right college can be a complicated and confusing process.

With the ambition to play collegiate lacrosse fresh in their minds, Minnesota middle and high school lacrosse players flocked to the Homegrown Lacrosse Collegiate Recruitment Workshop, a first-of-its-kind event that focused on helping young lacrosse players prepare for the college recruitment process.


Read the entire article here:
http://www.collegelax.us/news/2010/12/15/1st-of-its-kind-homegrown-lacrosse-fall-college-recruitment-workshop-a-success/
User avatar
CATLAX MAN
NCLF MVP
NCLF MVP
 
Posts: 258
Joined: Tue Apr 19, 2005 10:34 pm

College recruiting schedule

Postby BHSVIDEODAD » Mon Dec 20, 2010 10:43 am

I looked through the article. What is the typical schedule of a recruiting season. For example for a 2012 HS graduate, when are the decisions and commitments made? Is there a drop dead date for commitments?
BHSVIDEODAD
All Star
All Star
 
Posts: 173
Joined: Sat May 07, 2005 8:48 am

Re: College recruiting schedule

Postby Billax » Mon Dec 20, 2010 12:27 pm

BHSVIDEODAD wrote:I looked through the article. What is the typical schedule of a recruiting season. For example for a 2012 HS graduate, when are the decisions and commitments made? Is there a drop dead date for commitments?


What is the typical schedule of a recruiting season?
Depends on the NCAA Division, BHSVD. For DIII, summer before the Senior year, and then Fall of the Senior year are times to be seen by DIII coaches. For DI aspirants, summer before the Junior year and Fall of the Junior year are prime times. The schedule CATLAXMAN posted is just right for DII and DIII hopefuls, but DI coaches are in some mindless race to lock up "their" recruits ever earlier. Just a few years ago, DI and DIII were on the same schedule. Now, pretty much, DI is a full year earlier. Of course, players develop at different speeds, so a number of current uncommitted Juniors will end up being offered by DI coaches through this summer and into early Fall of their Senior years. But the real action for Juniors going DI is happening right now. For example, five of this year's NorCal Juniors committed before Thanksgiving of their Junior years. That's a much larger group of "early commits" than ever before in NorCal.

...[W}hen are the decisions and commitments made? Is there a drop dead date for commitments?
Depends on the NCAA Division and the Conference. NorCal has had guys to whom "exploding offers" have been made by DI coaches. That is, a coach might say, "We're extending you an offer and we want you to attend our school, but we've got somebody right behind you in the queue, so if you don't verbally accept within seven days, we're moving on." On the other hand, some DI coaches have said to NorCal guys, "We want you to attend our school and play lacrosse for us. Take as long as you want to make a decision." When a player signs up to play, at most DI or DII schools, he'll have to sign a "National Letter of Intent" (NLI) in the Fall of his Senior year (there's an NLI period in the Spring of a player's Senior year, too, but that's not often used by Lacrosse players). The Ivies and the Service Academies don't use the NLI, however. On the other hand, in the Ivies, you verbal to the Coach, but he cannot commit for the school. In the Ivies, your folder - transcript, test scores, lacrosse profile - goes to Admissisions on July 1st after your Junior year. If you pass muster with admissions, you'll receive what's called a "likely letter" from the Ivy you're hoping to attend. The likely letter says, in effect, "If your grades stay high and you don't get into trouble of any kind, we're likely to admit you this Fall.

DIII coaches and schools don't use the NLI at all or the likely letter (with a very few exceptions), but they want you to apply early decision. So that date is their "drop dead" date. If you do apply early decision to a top flight DIII school, get admitted, then change your mind - you won't get much help from other schools. Kind of an unwritten rule.

All very complicated, varying by Division, and also by conference, with Service Academies having rules of their own.
Sports don't build character, they reveal it. - Heywood Broun
User avatar
Billax
Forum Father
Forum Father
 
Posts: 3553
Joined: Thu Jul 29, 2004 6:49 am
Location: 37.882767, -122.198214

UC club team recruiting

Postby motiv8orr » Tue Dec 21, 2010 12:44 pm

I appreciate all the valuable information about college recruiting found here on the forums.

Specifically, I'm wondering about University of California club teams, such as Davis, Santa Cruz, Santa Barbara, etc., and if players are recruited while in high school. Or is it simply, "get into the school, then try out". Do the coaches attend tournaments to watch players?
motiv8orr
All Star
All Star
 
Posts: 100
Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2006 10:51 am
Location: North Bay

PreviousNext

Return to General Topics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron